Ryzen 7 3700x vs Ryzen 7 3800x

In this guide, we will try to navigate the possible differences between the Ryzen 7 3800X and the 3700X, and decide if the small price above the 3700X is worth it.

First of all, the very first thing about Ryzen 3800X vs Ryzen 3700X is the additional 100 MHz boost clock frequency on the 3800X and an additional TDP margin (105W for the 3800X versus 65W for the 3700X) for a premium of USD 70. The 21% higher launch price translates to just 2% more effective speed over the 3700X.

Ryzen 7 3700x vs Ryzen 7 3800x

We have compiled the specifications of all current AMD Ryzen 7 generation 8 products into a specification comparison table to make everything easier; We will compare the upcoming Ryzen 7 3800XT with the already established Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 7 3800X released.

Being an upgrade, the performance boost won’t be anything significant, but it’s worth mentioning that all Ryzen XT processors will boast a healthy 4% increase in single-core performance across the board over existing Zen parts 2 Matisse, primarily by boosting clock algorithm and Infinity Fabric settings.

For more casual overclockers like us, the difference will be even smaller. Our 3700X appears stable in our internal stress test and to date has not locked even once at 4.3 GHz. This is the same frequency limit for the retail 3800X we got. As for the TDP, that’s confusing, to say the least, but we’ll review some performance numbers first, and then discuss what we think is happening.

The top 20% of all tested 3800X processors passed their 4.3 GHz AVX2 stress test, while the top 21% of all 3700X processors were only stable at 4.15 GHz. Also, all 3800X processors passed the test at 4.2 GHz while the 3700X processors were only good at 4.05 GHz, which means the 3800X has about 150MHz more margin when it comes to overclocking.

We don’t think Intel will lose the crown of gaming performance on the high end because that will likely happen with the Ryzen 4000 series, but this Ryzen 7 3800XT processor with the updated maximum boost speeds and Infinity Fabric improvements could come very close. In Intel court, this difference will be too subtle to notice.

This technology is the main reason why AMD has such a scalable architecture and enables increasingly larger CPUs to be built with great performance and performance at a great price.

The heavily advertised 3700X offers real-world gaming performance compared to the USD 80 4-core 4-core Intel Core i3-9100F level. Priced at USD 320, the 3700X offers reasonable value for full-time multimedia encoders, but general desktop users, gamers, and even streamers should look elsewhere.

On the other hand, the 3800 is also 15% (USD 50) more expensive even than the i7-9700K. Additionally, the 3800’s memory controller, while significantly improved over previous Ryzen iterations, still has limited bandwidth and high latency that can also affect gaming.

Specifications :

Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 7 3800X quantitative parameters such as several cores and threads, clocks, manufacturing process, cache size, and multiplier lock state. These parameters indirectly indicate the performance of Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 7 3800X, but for an accurate evaluation, you should consider your test results.

FeatureAMD Ryzen 7 3700XAMD Ryzen 7 3800X
Cores / Threads8/168/16
Base Clock3.6 GHz3.9 GHz
Max Boost4.4 GHz4.5 GHz Clock
L3 cache32 MB32 MB
TDP65 W105 W
Process7 nm7 nm
SocketAM4AM4
FP32 Yield1,689.6 GFLOPS1,728.0
Die size74 mm² 74 mm²
Transistors3,800 million3,800 million
Check Price Check Price Check Price

Ryzen 7 3700X

Ryzen 7 3700X

Mi 3700x on b450f ,bios 2406 default plus “xmp” ram 3200 cl16 boost to 4.39ish and load 4.219ghz ,d15s average dual fan  r15 ~ 2190 temps <65c single core ~ ​​206 open gl ~ 165fps with 1070

Valley Bank Score: ~ 5256 (~ 4750 with 2600x) maximum 254 fps (maximum 206 with 2600x) minimum 44 (minimum ~ 36 fps with 2600x)

GTA5 max everything between 80-100 fps but I reject a couple of things to get 120 vsync

Ryzen 7 3800X

The 3800X had a very small advantage over a gaming 3700X, but a somewhat greater benefit when running general multitasking benchmarks. It appears that the 3700X is much closer to the 3800X than the 2700X to the 2700X. I would get the 3700X unless the money doesn’t matter.

Gaming Performance :

Let’s see how good Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 7 3800X are for gaming compared to the gaming system requirements. Remember that sometimes official requirements may reflect inaccurate actual performance.

So, for gaming specifically, we saw slightly higher gains with the Ryzen 7 3700X through its PBO feature than with the Ryzen 7 3800X, allowing that processor to nearly match the more expensive Ryzen 7 3800X at average frame rates across all configurations. That’s not entirely unknown: After overclocking, we saw the same trend for less expensive models from the previous generation (not X) that offers similar performance to AMD’s X-series processors.Ryzen 7 3800X

The big question seems to be … will the 3800X be a 100Mhz higher clock in all situations, or once the magnifications are applied, will it functionally be the same as the 3700X?

I don’t have an answer to this question … but I did notice something funny on the CPU UserBenchmark site. The 3800 results have started to appear (mentioned in other threads here).

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X averaged just 12.6% less than the maximum scores achieved by the group’s leaders. This is an excellent result that ranks the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X near the top of the comparison list.

The 3700X should offer very strong gaming performance, but it’s disappointed by its memory controller, which, while significantly improved over previous Ryzen iterations, still has limited bandwidth and high latency.

The range of scores (95th – 5th percentile) for the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is only 16.5%. This is a relatively narrow range indicating that the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X performs reasonably consistently in different real-world conditions.

The 3800X competes directly with Intel’s i7-9700K, benchmarks show that when overclocked, the 3800X is 10% worse for gaming but 30% faster for 64-core processing. The 3800X is also 15% (USD 50) more expensive than the i7-9700K. Additionally, the 3800X’s memory controller, while significantly improved over previous Ryzen iterations, still has limited bandwidth and high latency that can also affect gaming. Like other third-generation Ryzen processors, the 3800X is compatible with the new PCIe 4.0-compliant X570 chipset, as well as 400 and 300 series motherboards. Priced at $ 380, the 3800X offers a Fair value for purely workstation tasks like movie production, but streamers should look elsewhere. Streaming with dedicated hardware like NVENC or a separate streaming PC will almost always result in fewer dropped frames.

Overall, Ryzen 7 3700X for more or less give an equivalent performance to the 3800X, particularly if games greatly influence the purchase decision.

Ryzen 7 3700X

Pros

Needs less power

  Ryzen 7 3800X

Pros

Clocked higher

Drawbacks:

Operating frequency is lower

Avg. Memory Latency 79.2Pts

Avg. Octa-Core Mixed Speed 928Pts

Drawbacks:

Requires significantly more power

So, in short :

The differences in real life are minimal. The games work practically the same on both processors. Heavy workloads (rendering, compression, encoding) can take advantage of the Ryzen 7 3800X’s highest 300MHz base clock, but not much. Overall both are great CPUs for the price and you won’t go wrong with getting either one.

These powerful CPUs demand quality motherboards. The good news is that most motherboards capable of running the 3700X have VRM of sufficient quality to run 3800X.

So, carefully notice the certain features then choose according to your needs & expectations.

Last Thoughts :

We hope we have been concise and have compiled all this information into a simple format so that you can catch up to the 2020 Zen 2 update.

If you want to update to the 3800XT, you will have nothing to worry about when talking about compatibility as you will be able to use older AM4 boards with BIOS updates to work (or with USB BIOS Flashback).

Thank you for reading!

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